Monday, August 16, 2004

"The Mint" a San Francisco karaoke bar was accosted by a few un-named graduate students after consumption of Tapas and Sangria. Being they were in the area for the ASA, the Madison theory of karaoke (Freese and Harried 2004) had to be tested. Overall, the theory seems to be a good predictor of karaoke performance. The louder the cheers for those without a group of friends or the first-timers, the better the karaoke performance. Also, lots of friends are made and sociologists are seen as supportive, friendly academics, if amateurs, (don't ask about Tracy Chapman's "Fast Car"- unless you are a bass don't try it - which threatened to ruin prior credibility established by Bon Jovi's "Living on a Prayer").

4 Comments:

At 12:57 PM, Blogger Jennifer said...

So, perhaps karaoke is a means of taking sociology to its publics? Just kidding, we can have more interesting discussions of sociology, its publics, and the theme of public sociology based on ASA experiences (which I intend to post about in the not too distant future!).

 
At 1:02 PM, Blogger Jennifer said...

So, karaoke may be a means by which sociology can reach its publics? More to come on the discussion of ASA, sociology, its publics, and the concept of "public sociology/ies"!

 
At 3:08 PM, Blogger heather said...

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At 3:36 AM, Blogger Quit Smoking said...

Having discovered your blog through the blooger toolbar, I hope you don't mind saying that I have a ebooks site/blog. It pretty much covers ebooks related stuff. Check it out if you have time.

 

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